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The Imminent Death of Federalism

Friday, October 07, 2005

From Associated Press's article, Bush wants authority to order military quarantine of Americans by Jennifer Loven:
The president was asked if his recent talk of giving the military the lead in responding to large natural disasters such as Hurricane Katrina and other catastrophes was in part the result of his concerns that state and local personnel aren't up to the task of a flu outbreak.
 
"Yes," he replied.
I pose the question to you: Do you suppose this may be due to the fact that the Federal government has been slowly stripping all authority from the individual State governments for the last umpteen years? I mean, after all, the Federal government has all but neutered the States of any power they may have once had. The actions of the Fed are simply the natural conclusion to the process of creating a National Government. It is my opinion that if they succeed in their quest to use the military in matters such as these, Federalism is finished. Our republic will have finally passed into history.

1 Comments:

Anonymous Mark said...

Every government failure leads to a call for still more government, from schools to 9/11 to Katrina. More and more bureaucracies are created. More and more money is spent. But each new program fails to solve not only the original problem but all those problems created by the previous program.

We have dozens of intelligence agencies; we have Defense, FEMA and Homeland Security. The intel agencies have failed. So has FEMA and HS. FEMA and HS certainly made the Katrina situation much worse.

So, for those who, in spite of the demonstrated failure of central agencies, think that such agencies are the solution to all problems, what's left? The military.

This is a panic reaction by Bush and the feds. And you're right, it will destroy the last vestiges of federalism and the republic.

4:06 AM  

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